< SWITCH ME >

Topic switching at MEU Strasbourg on the third day: after the Council of the European Union has passed a favourable resolution on the accession of Croatia, it now rests on the Parliament to deal with the issue. At the same time, to keep everyone busy, the heavily amended music copyright proposal now passes from the European Parliament to the Council. Their cooperation is what is referred to as the ordinary legislative procedure, or "co-decision procedure" within the EU.

In any case there, as the conference reaches its final stages, it is reason enough for Ivana Dimitrova, Commissioner for Enlargement, to be content with the preliminary result of the voting. And the MEPs are quite happy with the desserts served in the cafeteria of the Louise Weiss building in Strasbourg. In German, "to dine like God in France" is a phrase for living in luxury - maybe that should be updated to "dining like an MEP in France"...

Day two has just started – "There is no consensus yet," says Morten Munch, UK delegate at the Council of the European Union. However, Maros Demovic, Bulgaria, feels he expresses the opinion of the majority of the Council members in saying that Croatia is a great challenge, but also a great opportunity for the European Union, also with regard to further possible enlargement. Finally, Claire Nevin for Greece is confident that "we'll pass it." But even so, an eventually favourable vote will still depend on the agreement of the European Parliament. Not forgetting the lobbyists who are constantly at work…

The Parliament in the meantime has been busy with the music copyright proposal. The devil is in the detail (at least as the Germans used to say), and the devil materialises in 40 amendments… learn more by watching the second newscast of the Strasbourg Insider!

Simulating the EU is not exactly an easy task. Thus one week ago, MEU Strasbourg started with a preparatory day, during which the future MEPs and delegates were briefed once more on the topics to be discussed in the following days, had the chance to consolidate the rules of procedure, and could exercise their debating skills.

From Monday on, things got serious and suits became mandatory. The day also brought another exciting feature: daily video newscasts put together by MEU’s video journalists Anke Harthoorn, Mitch Weaver, and Jan Zelina. It is thanks to the so-called Strasbourg Insider that MEU outsiders can nevertheless glimpse the inner workings of the simulation experience. This is why we decided that the videos should not be withheld from all the E&M Insiders out there.

Let Croatian Ambassador Marina Carre-Moliva explain the challenges and fears the Croatian people associate with becoming the 28th member state of the European Union. Listen to Commissioner Martin Dederke, when he envisions how the Music Copyright Proposal of the European Commission will bring the single market to the digital age. And let Magda Nemkyova from the European Greens explain how the Parliament in Strasbourg can help MEPs reduce their carbon footprint.

Friday, 26 April 2013 15:11

Simulating is not malingering. E&M at MEUS

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There are a lot more MUNs than MEUs out there, but there is only one MEUS, and since MEUS is a MUST, E&M is there to cover it.

E&M would not be E&M if it did not dismantle those cryptic abbreviations. Those who have been E&M maniacs for long enough as to read this age-old article can skip the following paragraph or delve into the Baby section instead. For everyone else, here you go:

MUN, MEU, MEUS, E&M. Basically, M stands for Model – not in E&M though, where it stands for Me, which is I, which is you, the readers, we, us… Yet except for E&M, M means Model, so far so good. A MUN nevertheless is not the conference of the prettiest of the international community, nor is a MEU an EU-wide beauty contest – at least not in the literal sense of the word. Rather than that, a MUN is a gathering of people willing to put themselves in the shoes of diplomats of the United Nation. And just the same kind of modelling or simulation when applied to the European Union and its political bodies is referred to as a Model European Union.

What may sound like a get-together of megalomaniac nerds playing war or big politics, is indeed a thrilling and very intense learning experience – and, if well organised, it can be tremendously realistic. 

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