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Wednesday, 04 February 2015 00:00

E&M welcomes a new cartoonist

Cartoons1  Baruffato
Photo courtesy of Alice Baruffato 
 

Lichtgrenze over Berlin - Alice Baruffato, December 2014

As a part of E&M's commitment to multimedia content, our magazine is glad to announce that the Italian illustrator Alice Baruffato will be sharing with us cartoons drawn exclusively for E&M. She works as an archaeological illustrator but she will be also be contributing specifically to E&M, so stay tuned and enjoy some of the most significant European issues being turned into thought-provoking drawings on a monthly basis. To find out more, E&M's Veronica Pozzi has interviewed her about her work as an archaeological illustrator and her life-experiences in Europe.

 

Alice

Alice Baruffato. If you feel you are already familiar with the name that's because she is not new to E&M. Last November, together with two friends, she wrote this article on her experience as a volunteer at the Berlin Wall. But the months she spent in Germany's capital are not the only European project in which she has participated. In this interview she shares those experiences as well as her personal views on Archaeology in Europe and the related job market.

 

E&M: Where does your passion for drawing come from? And how have you nourished it throughout the years?

 

Alice: My parents had a stationery shop. I remember I started drawing when I was a kid: I've always had this passion and, thanks to my parents' shop, I had access to good quality pencils and everything I needed. I took only one drawing course in my life, it was about cartoons but very short. For the rest, I just kept on drawing following my passion and as a self-learner.

Published in Beyond Europe
Saturday, 02 June 2012 09:05

Living the European Dream

Like many young Europeans, I have dreams and hopes for Europe - I want it to be a place of cultural and political awareness; a place where people from all walks of life and backgrounds can come together and feel like they belong; a place where our ambition and determination know no boundaries.

But also like many young Europeans, who are much more fortunate than our previous generations, I found myself completely lost and uncertain of what my path would be after graduating from university. How can I, a heavily-in-debt university graduate, keep up the voyage of European learning while avoiding being evicted or - maybe worse - moving back in with my parents (although mine are thousands of miles away on another continent)?

Then an opportunity opened up – last year I was accepted onto the European Voluntary Service (EVS) scheme to work on E&M

"Voluntary, did you say?" you might ask. Oh yes, my friends, but not only are living expenses compensated and language training provided, the work involved is way more mind-blowing than the many unpaid internships or coffee-making "traineeships" we have all applied for. I have had the chance to tailor my experience to be as European and as meaningful as I want.

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